Once a European and Twice an African

Once, all humans were Africans. It looks like that state of affairs may essentially re-establish itself one day!

I counted the first column of the page linked to above, and 22 out of the top 25 fertility rate countries are in Africa. And though I stopped counting, the next 25 is clearly over half African. Nor are differences minor: Everyone in the top 25 sees over 5 births per woman, while only a few European countries are even close to or just above 2 per woman (Ireland, Iceland, Albania, the UK, Sweden). The average for the EU as a whole is just above 1.5.

I knew this discrepancy existed, but I had no idea it was this vast! In 10,000 years, parents will be telling children horror stories about bizarre people in the past who had milk-colored skin with brown spots all over it, and hair the color of straw.

12 comments:

  1. You almost seem to take pleasure at the thought, Gene.

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    1. Nah. But nor am I upset: in this world, all things must pass. The whole human race will be gone one day, one way or another.

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    2. Sure, all things pass; but the assumption that extinct family lines and races would be the subject of horror stories is striking.

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    3. I never thought that I'd hear you say that, and I agree.

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    4. Well, John, the "other" is always the subject of horror stories.

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    5. Never read Lovecraft, John?

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    6. Never read Lovecraft, John?

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  2. One thing to consider is that they also have low life expectancy at birth, so the population growth is less explosive than it seems to be.

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    1. Well, another thing is that "they" -- oy, a telling pronoun! -- emigrant to European countries at a huge rate, where "they" have a much higher life expectancy.

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    2. Hmmmmm. Sounds like "If present trends continue ..."

      The only present trend that ever continues is that present trends don't continue.

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  3. What about their death rates? Or life expectancy.

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    1. Those certainly are higher... in Africa.

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