Capitalism and big government

"History shows, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the growth of capitalism and the growth of government go hand in hand. Capitalism and big government are not, as in the popular imagination and the economic treatises, things opposed; rather, the one grows on the back of the other, and the more you get of one, the more you will need of the other.” -- John Médaille



9 comments:

  1. As one anarchist I talk to said, "Capitalism absolutely requires the Leviathan.".

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  2. So the Soviets were extreme capitalists?

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    1. Some comparisons have been made between the Soviet Union and a giant corporation, so there's that. "Big government" is often a rather vacuous and vague phrase, anyway.

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    2. KPres, did you think *at all* before making this comment. The contention is that capitalism leads to the growth of big government.

      That is similar to saying, "Smoking leads to cancer."

      Your response is like responding, "My mother had cancer: therefore, I guess you are saying she must have smoked?!"

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    3. Or, to put in another (if I get the gist of the argument), big defense agencies.

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  3. Medaille is a distributist, but this is nothing that left-libertarians haven't been saying since, oh, forever.

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    1. I am very proud of you left-libertarians. I will give extra credit here.

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  4. How do you define "more capitalism?" If capitalism is the the private control of capital then we have a definitional problem as the statement implies that the more private control of capital there is, the bigger government is. But the government share of GDP figures will then not really fit.

    Perhaps by "more capitalism" is meant "the more concentrated the private control of capital" the bigger government. Which might work, since Sweden has a highly concentrated private sector. But then there is a chicken and egg problem, because the more pervasive government, the more it tends to favour concentration of capital.

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    1. But if we think the two processes go together, we don't really have to worry about which is the chicken or the egg.

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